Download e-book for kindle: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Volume 33, Issue 6, December by Paul Bloom & Barbara L. Finlay (Editors)

By Paul Bloom & Barbara L. Finlay (Editors)

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Extra resources for Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Volume 33, Issue 6, December 2010

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Recognize that cultural differences are important when interpreting facial expressions. Nonetheless, many of their core observations derive more from individualistic cultures than from collectivist cultures. ” These examples suggest constraints on the assumptions and applicability of the SIMS model. Niedenthal et al. posit an embodied model for perceiving the meaning of smiles through implicit simulation. As noted in section 6, the model is grounded on insights taken from predominately individualistic cultures.

Further, behavioral studies have reported that the perception of facial expressions can be modulated by eyegaze direction. However, the effect of gaze on emotion recognition depends on the type of expression. For example, it has been shown that angry faces are perceived to express more anger with direct than averted gaze, whereas fearful faces are perceived to express more fear with averted than direct gaze (Adams & Kleck 2003; Sander et al. 2007). These results can be explained within a selfrelevance framework (Sander et al.

Some collectivist cultures, like East Asian cultures, tend to avoid eye contact when processing facial expressions. Children in these cultures are taught that direct eye contact is a sign of disrespect (Argyle & Cook 1976). Such cross-cultural differences suggest that eye contact is a socially established cue that varies with particular cultural norms. How might such a socially refined behavior affect the SIMS model? Assuming that eye contact is the most frequent triggering mechanism for interpersonal simulation, East Asians would be predicted to often miss this trigger.

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Volume 33, Issue 6, December 2010 by Paul Bloom & Barbara L. Finlay (Editors)


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